2018-19 Pupil Premium

What is the Pupil Premium Grant?

The pupil premium grant is additional funding for publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils of all abilities and to close the gaps between them and their peers.

Why is this Important?

In a majority of schools, educational outcomes for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds are much weaker than their peers. Disadvantaged pupils are more likely to not achieve GCSE grades according to their potential; they are more likely to have poor attendance; they are more likely to be excluded from school; they are more likely to not be in education, employment or training after leaving school. Pupils of all abilities are affected. There is evidence that life chances for disadvantaged pupils can be improved with targeted support and the pupil premium grant helps with this.

Who is entitled to pupil premium funding?

Allocation

2018/19 Expected Funding

Pupils in year 7 to 11 recorded as Ever 6 FSM:  The pupil premium for 2018 to 2019 will include pupils recorded in the January 2018 school census who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) since May 2012, as well as those first known to be eligible at January 2018.

202

@ £935

£188,870

Looked-after children (LAC): The pupil premium from 2018 to 2019 will include pupils recorded in the January 2018 school census and alternative provision census who were looked after by an English or Welsh local authority immediately before being adopted, or who left authority care on a special guardianship order or child arrangements order (previously known as a residence order). These are collectively referred to as post-LAC in these conditions of grant.

   4

@ £2,300

£9,200

Service Children: For the purposes of these grant conditions, ever 6 service child means a pupil recorded in the January 2018 school census who was eligible for the service child premium since the January 2012 census as well as those recorded as a service child for the first time on the January 2018 school census.  The grant will be allocated as set out in sections 4, 5 and 6 below. Where national curriculum year groups do not apply to a pupil, the pupil will attract PPG if aged 4 to 15 as recorded in the January 2018 school census.

   9

@ £300

£2,700

Total

£200,770

 

Holy Family High School                                         PP Summary information 2018/19

Academic Year

 2018/19

Total pupil premium (PP) budget

 £200,770

Date of most recent PP Review

 Sept 2018

Total number of pupils

 878

Number of pupils eligible for PP

 215

Date for next internal review of this strategy

 May 2019

1.     Headline measures for Pupil Premium/Disadvantaged students 2018

HFHS pupils eligible for pupil premium funding

National average for all non-PP  pupils (other)

 Number of disadvantaged students in the Progress 8 score

37

n/a

 % Achieving a standard (4) pass in English & mathematics

56%

64%

% Achieving a strong (5) pass in English & mathematics

22%

42%

 Progress 8 score for disadvantaged pupils

-0.78

0.1

 Average Attainment 8 score per disadvantaged pupil

40.3

49.8

 % Disadvantaged students achieving standard E-BACC

12%

28.2%

 

            Current DP Learner Profile 2018-19

Year

Cohort

High Prior Attainment       

Middle Prior Attainment       

Low Prior Attainment       

All  No

PP  No

PP  %

All  No

All  %

PP  No

PP  HPA  %

All  No

All  %

PP  No

PP  MPA  %

All  No

All  %

PP  No

PP  LPA %

7

161

40

24.84

55

34.16

12

21.82

64

39.75

15

23.44

42

26.09

13

30.95

8

163

46

28.22

66

40.49

14

21.21

63

38.65

16

25.40

34

20.86

16

47.06

9

149

45

30.20

61

40.94

6

9.84

49

32.89

21

42.86

39

26.17

18

46.15

10

163

40

24.54

83

50.92

15

18.07

70

42.94

20

28.57

8

4.91

5

62.50

11

130

28

21.54

69

53.08

13

18.84

51

39.23

14

27.45

7

5.38

1

14.29

 

3.     Barriers to future attainment of the pupil premium students, in-school barriers;

A.     

On entry in Year 7, students with low reading ages are identified through baseline testing and follow-up comprehension testing shows many have weak literacy skills; particularly a reading age below ‘secondary ready’ (9.6yrs).  This prevents students from fully accessing the curriculum and is an immediate and significant barrier to learning.

B.     

Student resilience and independent learning is often low; for example not regularly completing high quality homework.  Lack of confidence in study skills also has a disproportionate effect on the ability to acquire the knowledge needed to successfully complete GCSE examinations, This may be due to lack of resources, a suitable place to work or the structure at home to facilitate learning. 

C.     

Student aspirations are often not as high as their peers.  Their expectations are less ambitious and they are prepared to settle for less. In addition mental health and emotional factors play a role in student confidence which disproportionately affects disadvantaged students.

 Barriers to future attainment of the pupil premium students, external barriers;

D.

Attendance of the pupil premium students is lower than their non-pupil premium peers.  Our data suggests that once attendance drops to 90% (persistent absence) there is a significant effect on outcomes. 

 

The most important and over-arching principle about how we can address these barriers to learning is to ensure that we have the best possible curriculum and the highest quality teaching for all our students.  To further support this, we have a ‘First Class’ approach to in-lesson support for disadvantaged students.  This ensures that they are clearly identified to teachers, that their work is marked first and that the students are a high priority for all the activities that take place in the lesson.  This includes directed questioning, support for literacy and the requirement to verbally contribute and improve oracy in lessons.  In addition, we have strategies to address the four barriers A-D as follows:

 

4.     Outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

A.     

Improved literacy skills of PP students so that they can fully access the curriculum and improve their outcomes.

Reading age (measured by GL assessment) must be at least chronological reading age.  

New literacy strategy in place with measurable impact so that at least 90% of PP students have a reading age that is their chronological age.

Early reading intervention shows improvement in all reading ages in Year 7 where students were identified as below aged 10.

Whole-school oracy strategy benefits PP students, as seen in lessons and in improved outcomes.

Improved quality of literacy seen in written work.

B.     

The disadvantaged students can articulate their improved study skills and are better prepared for assessments.  There is improved homework quality and increased attendance at afterschool activities that support revision.

Class charts homework records show no significant differences between DP and others.

Quality of homework in books improves.

Student voice indicates that students are more engaged in their learning outside school.

DP outcomes improve. 

C.     

Students can articulate the range of careers open to them and have accessed the activities on offer e.g. careers fair, higher education visits, and employer workshops.

In Y11 and Y13 they have clear, well researched aspirational plans and their destinations reflect this.

No NEET PP students.

Improved uptake of higher level post-16 provision with higher aspirations for university and training.

      D.

The school is able to demonstrate improved attendance for disadvantaged students and a reduction in persistent absence.

Overall attendance among students eligible for pupil premium improves so that it is at least as good as non- disadvantaged students nationally (>95%).

 

 Desired outcome A

 Chosen approaches

Rationale for this choice

 Staff lead

 Date for review

 Impact / Success

Improved literacy skills of PP students so that they can fully access the curriculum and improve their outcomes.

Reading age (measured by GL assessment) must be at least chronological reading age. 

Intervention:   Swift identification of poor readers using GL-Assessment guided reading and spelling tests.  SEND screening for those with reading ages of <9.6yrs including Irlens screening.

One to one/small group tuition to be provided by newly appointed literacy TA.  Reading scheme to be provided along with information for parents on how to support their child reading at home, followed up at parents evening.

Paired reading, Lexia and IXL numeracy programmes during form time intervention.

Mixed ability setting in Y7 so that students are working in groups with good readers with stronger use of vocabulary.

Whole-school:  Clear identification of PP students with low reading ages on ClassCharts to inform planning and support in lessons.  Yellow stickers with a particular focus on literacy marking.  

Whole-school CPD on ‘First Class’ teaching where a range of strategies are used within the classroom to enhance the outcomes of DP pupils.

Guided reading lessons for all KS3 students in the ‘Book Nook’.  ‘Drop everything and read’ each week during extended registration and in part of Character and Culture lessons.

Use of literacy tool kit in all lessons with a focus on reading and oracy development.  ‘If you can say it you can write it’ oracy strategy.   Literacy marking in books whole-school priority with supporting teacher CPD.

Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary development through subject specific resources e.g. glossaries and knowledge mats.  Use of PiXL Unlock – new vocabulary programme due for launch in March 2019.

English teacher linked to Drama and History departments in KS3 so that text and skills are aligned and one more effectively supports the other.  

Improving numeracy literacy across the curriculum and the use of phonics is proven to be highly effective at improving the attainment of all PP pupils. (EFF) 

Students should have the chance to read a wide range of challenging texts to keep developing their reading.

KPA

HT

JMK 

SLT after each termly data point.

Termly Governors Standards meeting.

All DP students at secondary ready reading age.

Teacher records, and work samples show improved quality of literacy.

KS3 and KS4 data for PP students monitored after each termly data point.

 

 Desired outcome B

 Chosen approaches

Rationale for this choice

 Staff lead

Monitoring

 Impact / Success

The disadvantaged students can articulate their improved study skills and are better prepared for assessments.  There is improved homework quality and increased attendance at afterschool activities that support revision.

Provide improved home-school communication through the ClassCharts APP.  This includes the ability for progress leaders to monitor patterns across the cohort in homework completion and target specific students for support.

At lunchtime and after school provide support for assisting in the completion of homework tasks, including access to ICT.

Access to GCSEPod for all PP students, monitored for PP uptake. 

Taught the use of Cornell note taking and how to access useful websites such as www.freesciencelessons.com to be shared with parents.

Elevate Study Skills Workshops provided for all KS4 students. Elevate parent workshops for KS4 parents, along with GCSE Information Evenings where study programmes are shared.

Character and Culture lessons to build in study skills and memory techniques.

Knowledge mats/organisers rolled out to all year groups.  By the summer term, for all students to have a folder with their complete set of knowledge mats. For these to be on ClassCharts for parents to access.  

PiXL Know it! Think it! Grasp it! Low stakes quizzing and testing encouraged through CPD and link meetings.

For all departments to have curriculum plans with detail the assessments between each data point.

EEF

Feedback; High impact for low cost, based on moderate evidence. +8

Homework; Moderate impact for very low cost or no cost based on moderate evidence. +5

KPA


Progress Leaders

Subject Leaders

SLT after each termly data point.

Termly Governors Standards meeting.

All DP students logged onto ClassCharts.

Teacher records, ClassCharts records and work samples show improved quality and frequency of homework.

 

 Desired outcome C

 Chosen approaches

Rationale for this choice

Staff lead

Monitoring

Impact / Success

Students can articulate the range of careers open to them and have accessed the wide range of activities on offer e.g careers fair, higher education visits, and employer workshops.

In Y11 and Y13 they have clear, well researched aspirational plans and their destinations reflect this.

Increased bought in time from independent careers officer.  Newly refurbished careers office in prominent part of the school.  Careers officer is high profile, attends all parent events, contributes regularly to assembly programme and has helped write part of Character and Culture Programme.

Y11 PP students receive 1-2-1 guidance with our independent careers officer, each has an individual career plan and the meetings are recorded for parents on Class Charts. Follow-up with student support mentors. 

Students also attend events and workshops and have a tour of the 6th form, they have talks from our current 6th formers and Q&A sessions.

Employer workshops, linked to the local job market, visits to local workplaces.  

Apprentice support, advertised prominently, application support 1-2-1. 

Charter and Culture lessons have units for each year group, age appropriate. Subjects also deliver careers information and this has been a recent CPD area led by our careers officer.

Support for PP and Bursary students continues into KS5 where they get additional support for UCAS applications, and 1-2-1 mentoring by UCAS tutor. Funding is used to support applications, visiting universities and open days etc..

Students should have access to systematic records of the individual advice given to them, and subsequent agreed decisions.

By the age of 16, every students should have had a meaningful encounter with providers of the full range of learning opportunities, including Sixth Forms, colleges, universities and apprenticeship providers. This should include the opportunity to meet both staff and students

KP

FF

JMc

Termly feedback from Careers advisor through LINK meeting.

Destinations reports.

Scrutiny of career plans, student voice.

Scrutiny of ClassCharts with careers interviews.

Careers calendar shared with SLT and Governors.  

No PP NEET at aged 16 or aged 18. 

Student voice indicates a clear, aspirational goal for further education or a career. Students are well informed.

 

Desired outcome D

 Chosen approaches

Rationale for this choice

Staff lead

Monitoring

Impact / success

The school is able to demonstrate improved attendance for disadvantaged students and a reduction in persistent absence.

Fully co-ordinated plan with new attendance team as follows:

Rapid communication via first day response.

Attendance panel meetings for PA’s

Regular follow ups and home visits, increased time of EWO purchased to support.

Use of link Governor responsible for Pastoral support will ensure that leaders and staff are challenged.

Implement early interventions and support via SENDCO and Mental Health and wellbeing lead.

Identified parents invited to attendance workshops where they can access support from a range of agencies. Rapid engagement with parents and full use of outside agencies is needed to support this plan.

Whilst there has been a significant improvement in the attendance of disadvantaged pupils, their attendance is still between lower than their non-disadvantaged peers in most year groups.  The link between attendance of less than 90% and poorer student outcomes is very clear.

PWE

JMK

ELT standards meetings every three weeks.

Termly Governors Behaviour and Attendance meeting

Improved attendance for DP and reduced persistent absence.


Pupil Premium Expenditure 2018/2019

Attendance EWO

£797

Attendance administration

£22,089

Increased use of careers guidance councillor

£4,425

GL-Assessment reading and spelling tests

£897

Lexia subscription

£916

Literacy Teaching Assistant

£6,259

Maths Teaching Assistant

£6,259

SENDCO assessment and EP referrals

£6,770

SLT PP Lead

£11,818.50

PP subsidy for school buses

£35,000

PP contribution to trips, events and speakers

£8,000

Teacher CPD to attend higher ability sessions

£5,015

PiXL membership and resources – thinking hard

£974

GCSEPod subscription

£419

PiXL App subscription

£150

POD staff mentoring time

£40,228

Wellbeing support / mental health support

£2,190

Homework club

£2,950

Admin

£5,912

Elevate

£1,317

Curriculum Resources

£35,270.60

Peri Fees

£3,500

Uniform/PE Kit (Y7)

£1,496

Revision Guides

£550

Trips

£3,500

Total

£206,703

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What’s Coming Up 

Thursday 4th April - Spring Arts Evening

Friday 5th March - Colour for Cancer Research Day (Bring £1 and wear one item of clothing to represent a cancer colour)

                            - School ends at 1.15pm

Monday 8th-Monday 22nd April – Easter Holidays

Wednesday 24th April - Year 9 Parents’ Evening

Friday 26th-Saturday 27th April - DoE Bronze Practice

Monday 6th May Bank Holiday

Friday 10th-Saturday 11th May - DoE Bronze Assessment

Monday 13th May – External exams begin

Wednesday 15th May - 30 pupils to Edge Hill (Aspire)

Wednesday 22nd May - 30 pupils to Edge Hill (Aspire)

Monday 26th-Friday 30th May – Half Term

For more information please see

Holy Family School Calendar

 

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Mr M Symes,

Holy Family Catholic High School

 Virgins Lane.

Thornton,

L23 4UL

Contact Us

sample0151 924 6451

   School Contact Mrs S Harris (Head’s PA):
         Tel: 0151 932 6106
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